Foods that are fermented, pickled, and probiotic.

Revivalist Kitchen Salad Dressings

Revivalist Kitchen Salad Dressings

Revivalist Kitchen Salad Dressings . Traditional foods, BFF diet, Paleo, Ketogenic, AIP, Friendly salad dressings. Click through for five recipes!

Salads can be a real wolf in sheep’s clothing when it comes to eating healthy. Often the dressing is the big bad here: commercial salad dressings are loaded with sugar and industrial oils like canola and soybean. It is so easy to shape up your salads with one of these simple homemade dressings. When you make your own dressings you will be filling your bowl with healthy fats, like the omega-3 rich walnut oil featured in O’s Extra Simple Vinaigrette. Plus we have given some of our dressings an extra probiotic boost by using yogurt and kraut. Not only are you covering your BFF Diet bases by getting in your F for fat and F for ferments, you get to save money as a lot of these dressings use inexpensive ingredients that you may already have in your pantry or fridge. A big bowl of organic greens, fresh veggies plus your favorite salad toppings and you have a quick and easy meal that won’t damage your health or bust your budget.

Octavia’s Extra Simple Lemon Vinaigrette

Revivalist Kitchen Salad Dressings . Traditional foods, BFF diet, Paleo, Ketogenic, AIP, Friendly salad dressings. Click through for five recipes!

Living in SoCal we are super fortunate to have access to really tasty citrus fruit picked fresh off the tree. Octavia has a cute little lemon tree in her back yard that totally explains why this is her go-to salad dressing. If lemons are not as plentiful in your neck of the woods you can substitute with whatever citrus fruits are available: lime or grapefruit would be tasty here too. The walnut oil gives a nice brain nourishing omega-3 boost plus it adds a pleasant nutty flavor to the dressing. This would be perfect with fresh greens with herbs, main course salads that feature fish or can pull double duty and make a great marinade.

O’s Extra Simple Lemon Vinaigrette
1/3C to 1/2C Lemon Juice (approximately 3 juicy lemons)
1/4C walnut oil
1/2C olive oil
1/2 tsp. sea salt

Juice your lemons and strain to remove seeds and pulp. Add all the other ingredients and whisk vigorously until combined. This dressing is very, very lemony and tart (Octavia tree has a lot of lemons that need to be used up) so maybe start using a little less lemon juice than the full 1/2C. This dressing has some major staying power, the flavor improves over time and under proper refrigeration you can hold on to it for a couple of weeks.

 

Creamy Preserved Lemon & Yogurt Dressing

Revivalist Kitchen Salad Dressings . Traditional foods, BFF diet, Paleo, Ketogenic, AIP, Friendly salad dressings. Click through for five recipes!

Island life is not for the Vaughan family as we learned from some time spent on Catalina Island a few years back. However this dressing is adapted from a recipe used by C.C. Gallagher, a crazy cute little spot on Catalina that features wine, cheese, sushi, tapas, jewelry, art and the proverbial kitchen sink. While we are glad to be back on the mainland for good, once given the Revivalist Kitchen makeover this dressing has become one of my very favorites of all time. In a way it reminds me a little bit of the beloved tangy ranch of my childhood, but with an elegant grown up spin. Preserved lemons are a tasty, salty Moroccan condiment that is easy to make if you have access to a lemon tree or inexpensive organic lemons, but they are also available to purchase at many stores. I serve this with romaine, avocado, diced bell pepper and chilled cooked shrimp but it is also amazing with salads that feature black bean or lentils. This dressing is good for up to five days.

1/2 C plain yogurt (we like Strauss Greek Yogurt)
1/4 C paleo mayo (primal kitchen is a brand we love or better yet use homemade)
1T diced preserved lemon
2T lemon juice

Juice your lemons and strain to remove seeds and pulp. Dice the preserved lemons into small pieces. Add all ingredients to a food processor and give a quick whiz to combine, leaving pieces of the diced lemon intact for texture. This dressing is good for up to a week.
Sesame seeds are a great source of calcium and provide a creamy texture and pleasant bitterness to this tasty dressing. Low glycemic coconut sugar balances the tahini and provides a nice subtle sweetness. This flavorful dressing is amazing with grilled chicken salad.

Tahini Dressing

Revivalist Kitchen Salad Dressings . Traditional foods, BFF diet, Paleo, Ketogenic, AIP, Friendly salad dressings. Click through for five recipes!
1/4 C Apple Cider Vinegar
1/2 C Olive Oil
1/4 C Tahini
1/2 tsp salt
1tsp coconut sugar

Add all ingredients to a jar and shake it up until combined. Or whisk it up in a big bowl, it’s up to you.

Ume Plum Vinaigrette

Revivalist Kitchen Salad Dressings . Traditional foods, BFF diet, Paleo, Ketogenic, AIP, Friendly salad dressings. Click through for five recipes!

Umeboshi Plums are a traditional, Japanese preserved food. Highly alkalizing, pickled umeboshi plums are the Japanese equivalent to the North American apple, as it’s rumored one a day keeps the doctor away. Ume plum vinegar is the salty brine leftover from the natural preservation process and should only contain the juice of the plum, sea salt and shiso, a jaggedy edged green herb known as Japanese basil. This recipe is Revivalist Kitchen’s answer to harsh and acidic red wine vinaigrette. It makes a great dressing for cabbage slaw and marinated vegetable salads. Warning: ume vinegar is extremely salty so it is best to avoid adding any additional salt when using this dressing.

1/4C Ume Plum Vinegar
1 C Olive oil
1 Tsp Organic Dijon Mustard
1 Tbl Chopped Shallot
Black pepper to taste

Add all the ingredients to the bowl of a food processor and give a whiz to combine. This dressing only lasts three days with the addition of the shallot, but you can make a batch omitting the shallot then add it in right before serving.

Creamy Kraut Dressing

Revivalist Kitchen Salad Dressings . Traditional foods, BFF diet, Paleo, Ketogenic, AIP, Friendly salad dressings. Click through for five recipes!

This dressing is super tasty, probiotic and a great way to use up the results of a less than perfect fermentation project. In fact this recipe was inspired by a suggestion on a fermentation forum given to an unhappy soul who made a big batch of less that yummy kraut. We knew that idea was too good to be reserved just in case of a mistake but it really does work. Cabbage got a little mushy? Tad too much salt? No problem here as it all gets whizzed up in the food processor into a bomb dressing that tastes equally great on mixed greens, a meaty steak salad or used as a dip for sliced veggies. Even if you are a fermenting expert who only produces stellar ferments, spare some of your fermented goods and give this dressing a try as it comes out zippy, creamy and loaded with flavor.

1/3 C ACV
2/3 C Olive Oil
1/4C kraut (or any facto-fermented veggies you got kicking around)

Add everything to a blender or food processor and puree until mostly smooth. This dressing is fermented and while it should be stored in the fridge, it can be used safely for as long as it tastes good to you.

©Revivalist Kitchen 2016. All rights reserved.

Tahini Salad Dressing . Traditional foods, BFF diet, Paleo, Ketogenic, AIP, Friendly salad dressings. Click through for five different salad dressing recipes!
Ume Plum Vinaigrette Salad Dressing . Traditional foods, BFF diet, Paleo, Ketogenic, AIP, Friendly salad dressings. Click through for five different salad dressing recipes!
Creamy Preserved Lemon Yogurt Salad Dressing . Traditional foods, BFF diet, Paleo, Ketogenic, AIP, Friendly salad dressings. Click through for five different salad dressing recipes!
Creamy Kraut Dressing. Probiotic, fermented, & delicious! Traditional foods, BFF diet, Paleo, Ketogenic, AIP, Friendly salad dressings. Click through for five different salad dressing recipes!
O's Simple Lemon Vinaigrette Salad Dressing . Traditional foods, BFF diet, Paleo, Ketogenic, AIP, Friendly salad dressings. Click through for five different salad dressing recipes!

BFF diet free resource library

 

How did your salad dressing turn out? Got any questions for us? Leave a comment below we would  love to hear from you!

Read all about why adding Bone Broth, Healthy Fats and fermented foods into your diet is the key to optimal nutrition. The BFF diet will stop hunger & sugar cravings, along with many more health benefits! Click through to read.

The BFF Diet

Fermented Probiotic Kimchi. Traditional foods, Paleo, GAPS, AIP, & Ketogenic diet friendly! Click through to read recipe!

Kimchi

2015_RK-1492-Edit-2

Kombucha Jello

Smoothies

Smoothies

9 Best Tools For Fermentation

9 Best Tools For Fermentation

9 Best Fermentation Tools! Kraut making can be truly successful with the right tools! Read all about our favorite tools to ferment with here!

 

Fermented foods are not just delicious and filled with digestion boosting probiotics, fermentation is easy and fun to make at home. At times, fermenting vegetables, dairy products and beverages at home can feel like a stinky and potentially dangerous science experiment. Not to mention how weird it can seem to want to eat a food that you know, without doubt, has been sitting out on your counter for almost a month.

 

Despite all your (and my husband’s fears), fermentation is a natural yet scientific process, a process that human beings have relied on to preserve nourishing food in times of plenty, for thousands of years.  Fermenting food at home is safe and beneficial when you use the right tools and follow the proper steps. 

 

When fermenting at home, a little information, some basic cookware and containers, plus some easy cooking techniques are all you need to ferment like a pro. Add in some courage, because sometimes it is not easy to try to do new things. The fact that all over town: the grocery store, farmers markets and restaurants, fermented foods are in does not always help things. Trendy food can seem a little intimidating to try and replicate at home. However one of the most rewarding things about cracking open your own jar of fermented hot sauce is knowing that you did it, you created it, plus you know exactly what was is in it. 

 

The secret here, what we really want to let you know, is that fermenting food is easy. While fermenting at home may seems too gourmet, way too salt of the earth, farm-y, or in clear violation of health code; to a lot of us. The real issue here is that fermented foods are some of the most beneficial additions to the modern diet.

 

Revivalist Kitchen wants you to know that you can make your own pickles, kefir, yogurt and kraut, in your own home! Especially since the price tag on some of the commercially available versions of these probiotic powerhouses are down right expensive. If you have an abundant garden or fresh, affordable, local produce then fermenting foods at home becomes an even more economical way to add truly traditional, deeply nourishing and powerful healing foods into your life. 

 

Below is a list of our favorite fermentation tools: 

 

  1. Food Processor: One that includes a shredding blade. It pays for itself quickly by saving you a lot of sweat and time spent grating vegetables. 

 

  1. Onion Goggles: These are so necessary when slicing and shredding onions to avoid tears. 

 

 

  1. Ball Jars: You don’t need anything fancy to start fermenting. Glass jars with the lid and ring of all sizes come in handy when fermenting at home. We suggest the wide mouth mason jars, because most fermentation tools fit and work with the wide mouth mason jars.

 

  1. Scale: With dry salt & brined ferments, it is important to know precisely how much salt to add so you will need to know the weight of the vegetables you use.

 

 

  1. Glass or Stone Fermenting Weights: These are for holding food under brine. This can easily be hacked: with small ramekins, vegetables and toothpick combo, or plastic bags of water, but if you find yourself fermenting often it nice to have an easy to clean glass weight that fits right into the top of a jar. Fermentation crocks often come with stone weights just for this purpose and they are great for larger quantities.

 

  1. Funnel Filler: A large funnel like cup that sits perfectly into the top of glass jars. Keeps your countertop and jars tidy, plus makes filling your jars easy. This is kind of an old school tool, look for it in the canning aisle at a hardware store or at Sur La Table.

 

  1. Pickle Pipe: This allows the fermentation gas (remember it’s alive) to release without letting oxygen in. This tool will give you more successful krauts with no mold. You can totally ferment without a pickle pipe, but you will have to babysit your ferments without one. Meaning you will need to burp your jar daily, plus it will spillover so there will be a mess to clean up as well. Not to mention…if you don’t burp it, that ferment could potentially explode in your kitchen!

 

  1. Kraut Pounder: One of the best vintage finds out there, kraut pounders are often made of wood and shaped a bit like a giant muddler (for the bar) or tiny baseball bat. The idea of the kruat pounder is that it is heavy with a flat surface on the bottom so you can beat up your shredded veggies and release all our tension, easily and extract even more precious liquid for your brine. 

 

  1. A Fermentation Diary: Record your process and recipe. Then note the results, as your ferments mature. It is easy to think you will remember exactly what you put in your amazing fermented salsa, yet we can testify that it is way easier to forget. After awhile, you will have your own fermentation cookbook with all your successes and lessons in one place.

9 Best Fermentation Tools! Kraut making can be truly successful with the right tools! Read all about our favorite tools to ferment with here!

As mentioned above, when getting into larger batches of fermented foods, it may be time to invest in large fermentation vessels or crock. All kinds of vessels exist just for the sole purpose of fermenting, from large plastic buckets (not necessarily Revivalist Kitchens first choice) to the Harsch five-gallon crock, Erin bought off craigslist and counts as a prized possession!

 

As much as we love our crocks, weights and onion goggles, the above tools are not all needed to start fermenting at home. If you do start getting really into fermentation though, some of these items like the food processor and scale will not only save you a lot of time, but they will help you maintain consistency in your ferments. You can start fermenting with a box grater and a washed out mayo jar, so don’t let any lists or anyone get in your way, but success does favor the prepared.

 

Find a recipe you like, weigh your produce at the store and notate and trust the process. Fermentation has been transforming foods for the benefit of human beings for thousands of years, so go ahead and rediscover what these foods can do for you. There are so many great resources on fermentation online, in books and maybe even classes in your local community, plus a lot of the time people who ferment foods are really cool, and love to share and talk about what they are making. 

 

Revivalist Kitchen wants to hear all about your fermentation adventures, so tag #BFFDiet on insta with your creations. Check out some of our fermented recipes below. Happy Fermenting!

© Copyright 2016 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

9 Best Fermentation Tools! Kraut making can be truly successful with the right tools! Read all about our favorite tools to ferment with here!

 

Love to Pickle? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

BFF diet free resource library

Cook & Ferment with us!…Click through below for more real food recipes!

 

Octavia Klein Photography

Fermented Pear Chutney

Roasted Fig Kefir Ice-Cream Probiotic. Fermented Raw Cream. Click through to read recipe.

Kefir Ice-Cream

Savory Pancakes

Savory Pancakes

Beef Bone Broth

Beef Bone Broth

Fermented Currant, Pear & Horseradish Chutney

Oysters with Fermented Kumquat

Oysters with Fermented Kumquat
Octavia Klein Photography

While tearing into a plate of $1 P&J Oysters at a happy hour in New Orleans, to my delight I pulled a small, misshapen pearl out of my mouth. Not the most beautiful of pearls, or the biggest but you would have thought I found an entire pearl necklace with all the hollering I did about it.

To date, that has been my best oyster experience by far but I would not be lying to say that experience only deepened my fascination with oysters. I can count myself in good company, as a waitress in LA I have served dozens of oysters to celebrities such as the smoking hot Emma Stone and stone cold fox Ryan Gosling.

Coming in at around a gram of protein each and loaded with minerals like muscle building zinc & blood enriching iron, these mollusks are not only beautiful to look at and just as delicious to eat but oysters are a diet secret of the stars. For a non-diet busting appetizer to dinner out look no farther than a half dozen on the half-shell. Oysters are a traditional food that have a history of nourishing everyone from humble native populations to the fanciest of fancy pants gourmands.

 

Like the British condiment Marmite, oysters are a polarizing food that many either love or passionately hate. Everyone who hates them seems to claim that it’s the texture that the problem. Allergies can also be a concern and my oyster allergic pal has coined a truly revolting nickname for the “mucus pies” that can make her itch and scratch if even a drop of oyster “liquor” hits her skin.

So for those who look at oysters and see either a briny death or a mucus pie I say so sad for you and all the more for me. If you want to give oysters another go, I highly suggest seeking out the freshest oysters you can find, ones that are on the smaller side & are shucked right before you eat them. Avoid oysters from warmer waters or during times of spawning. A spawning oyster is unpleasant to put it mildly.

Bubbly wines, stout & vodka are traditional beverage pairings for oysters and will enhance the subtle flavors of the oyster while red wine will only make “fishy” flavors stand out even more strongly. As I often have a few oysters for a light post market breakfast I find them delicious on their own and the only beverage I need is the gorgeous liquor contained inside the shell.

 

A past boyfriend described oysters as a vehicle for horseradish-y cocktail sauce, with hot sauce & lemon being my personal fave closely followed by traditional mignonette (essentially shallots & red wine vinegar). When at home I make the most of all my ferments and top oysters with ‘kraut juice, preserved lemons or one of my favorite ferment brines: kumquat & jalapeño.

Straight-up no chaser is another way I go about it and I reserve that for liquor rich oysters that are only the freshest of the fresh, such as the Luna oysters I was introduced to by Christophe Happillon, LA’s Oyster Gourmet. When buying oysters you want to make sure they are from a reputable supplier. In California it is law for establishments selling oysters to keep the shellfish tags on file and it is within your rights to ask to see them.

 

Last time I bought oysters at Wholefoods Market the young man commented to his co-worker that “you gotta love a woman who shucks her own oysters”. As much as I know the kid was awkwardly trying to flirt or compliment me I bristled at his sexist comment. It does not take a genius, a penis or a culinary degree to shuck your own. There are a zillion instructional posts & videos out there and an most places that sell oysters also sell oyster knives. That is in only pre-req: an oyster knife.

I like to use my hubby’s technique to hug the oyster in a towel as you open in but in reality an oyster knife is all you really need, not a kitchen knife, not a screwdriver (unless a trip to the emergency room is your idea of a good time). Get yourself a real designated oyster knife and do some research. Sitting at an oyster bar like the Oyster Gourmet at Grand Central Market is a great way to watch a pro in action and more than likely they will give you a few of their tips. Here are a few of my own:

 

  1. Buy the freshest oysters available from a reputable source. Keep oysters refrigerated in a colander filled with ice, on a dish to collect melting water.
  2. Obtain an oyster knife.
  3. Fold a kitchen towel in half lengthwise once, then one more time, then fold both towel ends in towards the center. Fold that in half, in essence creating a little pocket to hug and stabilize the oyster while protecting your hand.Octavia Klein Photography
  4. Insert the oyster with the larger bowl shaped shell on the bottom, head first into your towel pocket with the bottom pointy edge sticking out about an inch.
  5. Securing the oyster by pressing down on the towel, nose the oyster knife into the apex of the point, where both shells come together. Avoid stabbing the oyster, ease the knife in.
  6. Once the tip of your knife is in, it’s like using a key in a lock. Using an upward twisting motion, unlock the top shell and use the flat part of your knife on the inside top of the shell to release the oyster and lift the shell. Try to hold the oyster as still as possible to avoid losing the precious liquor.Octavia Klein Photography
  7. I run my finger around the edges of the oyster, feeling for debris such as shell fragments for removal.
  8. Give the oyster a sniff: it should smell fresh and of the sea. A dead oyster smells bad and a bad oyster is not something you want to tangle with. Any doubts, chuck it out.Octavia Klein Photography
  9. Run your knife under the oyster to free it of the bottom shell. You will need to cut through the adductor muscle otherwise when you slurp your oyster, it will stay firmly attached to the shell. I like to flip the oyster over to reveal what I consider the prettier side, and to ensure it is released from the shell.
  10. I immediately dispose of the shells & rinse the towel before I launder it to avoid any surprise kitchen stank.
  11. Repeat with your remaining oysters, top with your condiment of choice and enjoy!
    © Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

    How did the recipe turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

    BFF diet free resource library
    Keep on cooking!…Click through below for more real food recipes!

Brussels Sprout Salad, Vegan, plant based, delicious salad. By Revivalist Kitchen!

Brussel salad

Sangria and mulled wine mash up, perfect holiday cocktail for your guests! By Revivalist Kitchen!

Sangria

Delicious Pink Peppercorn Pork Shoulder made with bone broth! AIP, GAPS Diet, & Paleo friendly meal. By Revivalist Kitchen!

Pink Peppercorn Pork Shoulder

Fish Broth

Fish Broth

Kombucha Jello

Kombucha JelloKombucha Jello. Probiotic, Fermented! Traditional Foods, Paleo, GAPS, AIP, & Ketogenic diet approved.Click through for recipe!

Kombucha jello is a very  nutritious, probiotic and just about pure protein.  That’s an amazing combo for a yummy snack! Kombucha jello is a good pre or post workout snack.  It’s also super easy to make and you only need two ingredients, Kombucha and gelatin. You will also need a mixing bowl, a whisk, and some form of jello mold to put it in. You also want to make sure you use a good quality gelatin, we love Great Lakes Gelatin. there are other brands out there, but you want to be sure to get gelatin that comes from happy, grass fed, cows.

Kombucha Jello. Probiotic, Fermented! Traditional Foods, Paleo, GAPS, AIP, & Ketogenic diet approved.Click through for recipe!

Again super easy!!! Put one tablespoon of gelatin per two pints of liquid in a mixing bowl, then stir it up (with Bob Marley’s song in your head…little darling.) It may fizz up a bit when you stir it, that’s just the probiotic in the kombucha, it will simmer down in a minute.

Kombucha Jello. Probiotic, Fermented! Traditional Foods, Paleo, GAPS, AIP, & Ketogenic diet approved.Click through for recipe!

 

Once the gelatin is dissolved, pour the solution into fun jello molds, or a shallow pyrex dish, and put in the refrigerator to set. Sometimes you may have to heat the solution to get the gelatin to dissolve, but we prefer not to heat the kombucha, as it may kill some of the live probiotic. The setting time varies, but  should take a few hours or so. Then voilla!! You’ve got yourself some beautiful, yummy, jello!! If the jello does not pop out of the mold or pyrex dish, just dip it in some hot water for a few seconds and then they should slide right out.

Kombucha Jello. Probiotic, Fermented! Traditional Foods, Paleo, GAPS, AIP, & Ketogenic diet approved.

 

A very fun and easy way to get kids to enjoy these too is to add a couple table spoons of raw honey, this will sweeten the deal for the kidos!

Kombucha Jello

1 tbls Great Lakes Gelatin

2 pints Kombucha

Optional: 2 tbls raw honey

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

How did the recipe turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

 BFF diet free resource library

Keep on cooking!…Click through below for more real food recipes!

Brussels Sprout Salad, Vegan, plant based, delicious salad. By Revivalist Kitchen!

Brussel salad

Octavia Klein Photography

Fermented Pear Chutney

Roasted Fig Kefir Ice-Cream Probiotic. Fermented Raw Cream. Click through to read recipe.

Kefir Ice-Cream

Smoothies

Smoothies

Kimchi

Kimchi

Fermented Probiotic Kimchi. Traditional foods, Paleo, GAPS, AIP, & Ketogenic diet friendly! Click through to read recipe!

Probiotic Kimchi

Kimchi, Kimchee, good for you and good for me. Both spellings are right, depending on who you ask and no matter the name they take, fermented foods like kimchi are the perfect addition to every meal.This recipe is more kimchi inspired due to lack of the Korean chili paste used in many traditional recipes. I use chili flakes and tomato paste and it tastes pretty awesome to me. The fish sauce adds depth, while the ginger gives it a nice brightness. After assembling the ingredients and with the addition of fermentation time, you are left with the kind of kimchee you may just scarf directly out of the jar.

Fermented Probiotic Kimchi. Traditional foods, Paleo, GAPS, AIP, & Ketogenic diet friendly! Click through to read recipe!

Kimchi

Outfit your food processor, if you have one, with the slicing blade and cut the cabbage lengthwise into wedges that fit in the chute. If cutting the cabbage by hand, a larger chop is totally fine and will taste equally good, just be mindful of large chunks of the core and slice them thinner or discard. Trim, peel and cut the diakon, slice the onions and spring onions and combine all ingredients into a bowl.

Fermented Probiotic Kimchi. Traditional foods, Paleo, GAPS, AIP, & Ketogenic diet friendly! Click through to read recipe!

Kimchi

 

Either with a kraut pounder or with your hands like in the picture, squeeze and press the vegetables until enough liquid is released to cover the vegetables. If there is not enough liquid released and you are not lightly sweating you should probably keep pounding for a little longer. If you are in a full sports sweat and you still don’t have a lot of liquid for your kimchi, you can add some filtered water to top it up but add the very minimum you need to keep vegetables submerged.

Fermented Probiotic Kimchi. Traditional foods, Paleo, GAPS, AIP, & Ketogenic diet friendly! Click through to read recipe!

Kimchi

 

(If you are using starter or whey– see below–add it now.) Mix it up, jar it up and put the jar on a plate or dish and leave out somewhere of average room temperature (not on the toasty top of your fridge for example, unless you want a really fast, possibly explosive fermentation) and not in direct sunlight.  Vegetables should be submerged under liquid and a few slices of vegetables and toothpicks or water in plastic baggies can be used if it needs but I just use screw top jars and stuff the veggies in and fill them pretty close to the top. The overflow, which makes my husband nuts but I just wipe them and rinse the tray. Don’t tighten the lid too tight and open the jars every day to burp them. Within a few days things should be bubbling along nicely. Let it sit for three weeks or so for maximum microbial benefit but taste as you go, the level of softness the vegetables develop can be a matter of personal taste. If any mold appears, something went wrong and it needs to be chucked out–100%–for sure.

Kimchi

2lbs organic Napa Cabbage
6T Salt
2T Tomato Paste
2T Fish Sauce
1/2 C diakon radish, peeled & cut into thin medallions
1 Yellow Onion, sliced
3 Spring Onions, sliced
1/4 C raw milk whey or fermentation starter, If desired*

*I like to use whey or a fermentation starter like Caldwell’s because: the chances of mold are highly reduced; I often have raw milk whey leftover from making kefir; ferments take less time. However I have successfully fermented non-organic but farm-y looking cucumbers in unfiltered tap water left out overnight to allow the chlorine to evaporate with no starter and it worked, so the microbial life on vegetables alone is often sufficient to get an awesome ferment going, no starter needed.

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

How did the recipe turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

 BFF diet free resource library

Keep on cooking!…Click through below for more real food recipes!

Octavia Klein Photography

Fermented Pear Chutney

Roasted Fig Kefir Ice-Cream Probiotic. Fermented Raw Cream. Click through to read recipe.

Kefir Ice-Cream

Savory Pancakes

Savory Pancakes

Beef Bone Broth

Beef Bone Broth