Revivalist Kitchen’s Christmas Cassoulet

Sangria

Sangria

Sangria is not just for summer! Living in California we tend to be sadly short on cold winter evenings and a drink like mulled wine is one that will heat you up in from the inside out. This is a naughty mashup of mulled wine and sangria: a holiday punch that tastes like Christmas, but will keep your guests from completely overheating. Lookout though this spicy punch packs a punch and you may want to tear down the mistletoe before things get out of hand…Just saying’.

Sangria and mulled wine mash up, perfect holiday cocktail for your guests! By Revivalist Kitchen!

Ingredients:

2 Bottles inexpensive red wine

1 Pint of brandy

2 T Cinnamon

2 Tp Nutmeg

1 T Vanilla Extract

1/4 C Honey

1 Cup Orange Juice–Cara cara oranges are Revivalist Kitchen fave

2 T Orange zest

1/4 C Pomegranate juice

2 T Lime juice

2 T Lemon juice, Meyer lemon would be great if you have it

 

Mix the honey with the citrus juice and mix well. Add all the ingredients together in a large beverage dispenser or punch bowl. Garnish with sliced oranges and pomegranate seeds. Serve over ice.

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

Sangria and mulled wine mash up, perfect holiday cocktail for your guests! By Revivalist Kitchen!

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Pink Peppercorn Pork Shoulder

Pink Peppercorn Pork Shoulder

 

There is a pink pepper tree on my dear friend Sarah’s back porch. The few hours I have spent picking and sorting the peppercorns from the twigs and leaves have been well worth the effort, as this little pepper freak can’t get enough of the stuff. I like to grind the peppercorns in the food processor and save it in a little jar to have on hand for when pork shoulder goes on sale.

 

Pork shoulder, pork butt, or picnic cut is what I’m talking about. This cut of meat is tasty and takes to this slow cooking method in the same way it takes to the pink peppercorn rub.

Delicious Pink Peppercorn Pork Shoulder made with bone broth! AIP, GAPS Diet, & Paleo friendly meal. By Revivalist Kitchen!

I suggest you make extras, as the leftovers are worthy of the recipe itself. It takes a little time but most of it is hands off. If you buy a nice fatty cut you will end up with a good amount of rendered creamy lard that will solidify as it cools and can be reserved and used to sauté up some veggies at other time or can be used to schmear on some sourdough bread.

 

Delicious Pink Peppercorn Pork Shoulder made with bone broth! AIP, GAPS Diet, & Paleo friendly meal. By Revivalist Kitchen!

Pink Peppercorn Pork Shoulder

3lb piece of pork shoulder, nice and fatty

1/4 C pink peppercorns, ground

3T sea salt

2 cups chicken bone broth

5 bay leaves

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Mix the sea salt and the pink peppercorns together and rub over pork shoulder. Ideally this can be done the night before you intend to cook the pork but if time is of the essence rub the shoulder and let it rest at least 30 minutes at room temperature. Pre-heat the oven to 325°.

 

In a casserole dish just large enough to snugly hold the pork, add the shoulder, the broth and the bay leaves. This is not a braise in a sense that the pork should be swimming in broth, so if only a cup of the broth fits in your pan use that and top it up as it cooks.

Cook the pork for 2-2.5 hours at 325, turning the roast every 30 minutes. This allows it to evenly brown and results in a super juicy cut of meat.

 

When fully cooked the roast will be tender but not falling apart, resulting in a sliceable roast. The broth will reduce a little as it cooks but ideally allow the roast to rest for 15 minutes before slicing and further reduce broth until desired consistency: I like it on the thinner side but you can bring it all the way down into a syrupy glaze. Taste before adding any additional salt, as the salt from the roast has seasoned the broth.

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

How did the recipe turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

 

Delicious Pink Peppercorn Pork Shoulder made with bone broth! AIP, GAPS Diet, & Paleo friendly meal. By Revivalist Kitchen!

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Duck Confit

Harvest Dinner

Harvest Dinner

Fall is a beautiful time of year, even in LA we see the leaves changing as the weather begins to cool. Relaxing with friends over a good meal, this time of year is filled with amazing sunsets, gratitude and celebration for the progress the year has made. This being Revivalist Kitchen”s first holiday season we wanted to do up a very a special, intimate, harvest dinner to celebrate our dear friends, our good health and the bonds we have created this last year. The table was set in our beautiful, lush, back yard and our friends made their way over to enjoy the fruits of our labors. We broke out the crystal and place cards! And the weather was perfect, a warm early fall evening, not a late summer scorcher as we so often get in Los Angeles.

Harvest Dinner, a non-traditional take on Thanksgiving. Featuring Duck Confit, celery root puree, fermented chutney & delicious sides by Revivalist Kitchen.

 

Since it’s usually just the two of us, every year my husband and I usually make a Peking duck for two, and even roll out homemade pancakes. To celebrate the joint venture that is Revivalist Kitchen, we wanted to usher in our first year on the block by opening up our home to friends: some old and some new.

Harvest Dinner, a non-traditional take on Thanksgiving. Featuring Duck Confit, celery root puree, fermented chutney & delicious sides by Revivalist Kitchen.

It was Erin’s idea to serve duck confit, instead of a traditional turkey. A nice compromise with the Peking duck of the past and with traditional confit style duck being one of my favorite dishes I was totally on board. Plus, it was a recipe I definitely wanted to try to make on my own and have in back pocket. Turns out it isn’t so hard to make! Woot! Woot! Just takes a few steps of simple preparation over a few days with a truly spectacular result. We bought our duck meat and duck fat from our favorite local butcher McCall’s Meat & Fish. Find recipe for duck confit here.

Harvest Dinner, a non-traditional take on Thanksgiving. Featuring Duck Confit, celery root puree, fermented chutney & delicious sides by Revivalist Kitchen.

For the side dishes we decided on sautéed mushrooms, green beans with shallots, celery root puree, and a beautiful fermented pear and currant chutney to accompany the duck. The pear chutney turned out to be my favorite part of the meal and I’m still using it on many other types of meat. This probiotic recipe is an American take on the chutneys of India and the mostarda of Italy, appropriate at a time where we reflect on the multicultural influences that make our country so great. Find the Pear Chutney recipe here. Recipes for sautéed mushrooms, green beans with shallots, and celery root puree.

 

We welcomed our guests to our harvest dinner with a beautiful, fermented, apple daiquiri. This is a traditional daiquiri, not the blended, sugary, drink, garnished with an umbrella you be thinking of. (however I suspect Erin would have stuck an umbrella in it if I had busted some out).  The classic daiquiri was first invented during the late 19th century imperialism in a Cuban mining town. It was a bartender at, Havana’s La Floridita that came up the frozen creation that we all know today, with Mr. Ernest Hemmingway being a big fan, Our take on the daiquiri featured a local, organic rum and we toasted our friends over snacks and introductions. Find the apple daiquiri recipe here.

Wine3-1

 

 

Erin made a lovely bagna cauda, which means warm bath in Italian and it bathed us all in glorious, melted anchovy butter. We served that with crudité and sourdough bread, and as we enjoyed a raw cheese plate and finished our cocktails we began to open our wine and fill ourglasses. Revivalist Kitchen firmly believes that a healthy life can include a few indulgences and this harvest dinner was the perfect time to treat our loved ones and also treat ourselves. Find recipe for bagna cauda here.

Harvest Dinner, a non-traditional take on Thanksgiving. Featuring Duck Confit, celery root puree, fermented chutney & delicious sides by Revivalist Kitchen.

The sweet that finished this lovely meal was a delicious, pumpkin, custard that Erin whipped up. A delicious end to a lovely evening. Find pumkin custard recipe here.

We are so grateful for the future of Revivalist Kitchen and we drifted off to sleep with full bellies and warm hearts, thankful for the time spent with those we love.

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

How did the recipes turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!


BFF diet free resource library
Keep on cooking!…Click through below for more real food recipes!

Delicious Pink Peppercorn Pork Shoulder made with bone broth! AIP, GAPS Diet, & Paleo friendly meal. By Revivalist Kitchen!

Pink Peppercorn Pork Shoulder

Revivalist Kitchen’s Christmas Cassoulet, yummy french traditional cuisine, made with fresh whole food ingredients!

Cassulet

Beef Bone Broth

Beef Bone Broth

Kimchi

Kimchi

Celery Root Puree

Celery Root Puree

Celery root is one ugly vegetable that hides its true beauty in a creepy, hairy skin. I learned about the joys of celery root during my time working in a French restaurant that featured the root, also know as celeriac in creamy soups, in a raw aioli dressed salad they called celery root remoulade and also in a buttery rich celery root puree.

We served this yummy celery root puree at our Revivalist Kitchen Harvest Dinner. Read all about that beautiful meal here!

Celery Root Puree, gluten free, low glycemic, Paleo & GAPS diet friendly. By Revivalist Kitchen!

When purchasing celery roots select firm roots that are heavy for their size, when past their prime celery roots can get spongy on the inside and that is not very nice. I usually don’t mess around with the bumpy skin on the bottom of the root and slice the bottom of the root off and then peel the rest with a vegetable peeler. Like an apple, once peeled celery roots begin to oxidize so to prevent browning hold peeled celery root in acidulated water (a bowl of water with a large squeeze of lemon or splash of vinegar).

 

Adding celery root to a pot of mashed potato is a great intro but this creamy smooth puree is a wonderful introduction to this under appreciated vegetable.

Celery Root Puree, gluten free, low glycemic, Paleo & GAPS diet friendly. By Revivalist Kitchen!

Ingredients:

2 celery roots, peeled and cut into even pieces.

1 Tp white pepper (I love white pepper but it can be spicy, use caution)

1 Tp salt

1 stick of butter

Up to 1/4 C cream, as desired to texture.

 

Cook celery root in salted water until soft. Drain and add to blender with butter, salt and white pepper and blend. If the mixture needs some additional liquid to start the blending process add a splash of cream. Taste for seasoning and if you like a thinner puree add the rest of the cream. A puree of just the vegetables will be sturdier but I like it creamy and light, yet still thick enough to hold together on the plate. Serve warm.

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

How did the recipe turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

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Keep on cooking!…Click through below for more real food recipes!

Green Beans with Shallot

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Sautéed Mushrooms

Mushrooms

Mushrooms and I have enjoyed a whirlwind love affair that has simmered down into a warm fuzzy appreciation. As a kid I would not touch a mushroom for money and the idea of consuming a fungus on purpose completely grossed me out. Times have changed and it was a creamy mushroom pasta that first helped me leave my childhood mushroom hating foolishness in the past, mushroom pizza’s inspired the first flickers of a crush and it was perfectly sautéed mushrooms over a steak that finally ignited my obsession.

 

Now I eat mushrooms pretty much every day, mainly the humble brown cremini. I like them all different ways in soups, as side dishes and in sauces. You will never see me pass up an opportunity up to peruse the mushroom stand at the farmers market. Foraging for my own mushrooms is a dream that I hope to pursue as soon as I find a willing guide, but for now I must be content just to enjoy cooking, eating and sharing the shroomy love.

 

I eat mushrooms because, they taste awesome, but they are also super nutritious! Not only are mushrooms powerful antioxidants they are loaded with selenium, folate and vitamin D. Mushrooms are the perfect assistant to our bodies way of repairing itself: nourishing our cells, DNA and liver. Depending on the variety, certain mushrooms are recognized for powerful medicinal properties, but like anything with the power to heal, mushrooms also have the power to hurt: so never eat a mushroom you are not sure is safe. That said, fall is a great time to dive into the land of cultivated and wild mushrooms and this easy recipe will be an elegant side dish for your holiday meal. We served these delicious sautéed mushrooms with our Revivalist Kitchen Harvest Dinner. Read all about that lovely meal here!

Ingredients

2 pounds assorted mushrooms of your choice: I used 1.5 lbs of cremini, bunashimeji also know as brown beech and king oyster mushrooms

6 Tablespoons butter

1 tsp sea salt

Chopped parsley or chives for garnish

Octavia Klein Photography

 

Wipe the cremini mushrooms off with a damp towel and trim the stems. Cut the base off the bunch of bunashimejis to free them from the clump they are usually sold in and trim the bottom cut end of the king oysters. Cut the cremini’s into even sized wedges, depending on the size quarters or sixths usually works for me. Rough chop the bunashimejis and slice the king oysters.

 

Warm a large saute pan over medium high heat. When hot, add the cremini mushrooms first, then the butter & salt and allow to cook, stirring occasionally. To get a nice brown crust on the mushrooms they need to be cooked in one layer in a pan large enough so they are not over crowded. Mushrooms contain a lot of moisture and you want to let the moisture be released and evaporate. Once the creminis have began to color add the other mushrooms and sauté until brown, about 5-8 minutes. Top with herbs to serve.

 

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

How did the recipe turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

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Keep on cooking!…Click through below for more real food recipes!

Brussels Sprout Salad, Vegan, plant based, delicious salad. By Revivalist Kitchen!

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Mmmm Chicken Soup

Mmmm Chicken Soup

Pumpkin Custard

Pumpkin Custard

I am officially over pumpkin spice everything but even during these times of severe pumpkin abuse, I just cannot resist making a few pumpkin desserts, like this delicious pumpkin custard. While I could house an entire pumpkin pie and call Thanksgiving done and dusted, in honor of Revivalist Kitchen this recipe was created to feature a not over sweetened, reasonably spiced dessert that is the perfect end to a rich meal but with the liberal use of farm fresh eggs, a slightly larger portion could be a nutritious and satisfying cap on a lighter meal. Featuring fresh roasted pumpkin, creamy naturally sweet raw whipped cream and spiced pumpkin seeds; this pumpkin custard will make a beautiful addition to your holiday table. We featured this desert at our Harvest Dinner. Read all bout what we served up here!

Octavia Klein Photography

Pumpkin Custard

2 cups pumpkin puree

1/2 Cup Coconut Sugar

1 T Molasses

1 Tsp fresh grated nutmeg

1 Tsp fresh grated cinnamon

1 Tsp vanilla, scraped from vanilla bean

8 Eggs

1/2 Cup Milk or if Paleo use coconut Milk

1/4 tsp Sea Salt

Pumpkin Custard! Gluten free & refined sugar free! Traditional food & Paleo friendly recipe! Click through to get recipe.

Pumpkin Custard

Roast the pumpkins in 350° oven until soft. Scoop out flesh, reserving seeds to be toasted and blend all ingredients in food processor, except for eggs. Pour blended mixture into heavy bottom saucepan over medium heat. Taste for seasoning and turn off heat once mixture is at a simmer. Off the heat whisk in the eggs one at a time and then bring the mixture back up to a simmer. Pour into individual serving vessels and chill in refrigerator. Top custard with raw whipped cream and the toasted spiced pumpkin seeds.

 

Toasted spiced pumpkin seeds

1 C pumpkin seeds, rinsed

1 2 T coconut sugar

1/4 tsp each cinnamon & nutmeg

2T melted butter

1 tsp sea salt

Octavia Klein Photography

 

Pre-heat the oven to 300°. Mix together all ingredients except seeds, once mixed, toss in pumpkin seeds. Spread seeds over a baking sheet and bake. You will want to stir the seeds every five minutes and bake until crispy. This process takes about 25-35 minutes.

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

How did the recipe turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

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 Keep on cooking!…Click through below for more real food recipes!

Octavia Klein Photography

Pumpkin Cupcakes

Roasted Fig Kefir Ice-Cream Probiotic. Fermented Raw Cream. Click through to read recipe.

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Carmel Corn

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Duck Confit

Duck Confit

Octavia Klein Photography

Eating duck for the first time was not the most memorable experience of my culinary life, while eating duck confit for the first time will forever be seared into my brain. It was, Walter Manske’s, duck confit at Church & State that did me in. I was a server there and had the good fortune of being handed the remnants of a crispy golden duck leg by another server, to wolf down as we stood near the dish tank, hovering over the garbage cans. Holy cow, that duck was good.

 

Next time I had duck confit, I actually ate it off a plate and the crispy outside and meltingly tender inside was accompanied by a chutney like fruit sauce. It took a good duck confit for me to get duck. Never being blown away with duck breast, I have had duck dishes other than confit that I enjoyed: chef Ericka Lins formerly of Campanile, makes a wicked duck meatball, the duck pancakes at Chi Dynasty in Los Feliz are tasty other than that I don’t really go out of my way to make, buy or order duck. The exception is duck confit for me, and the duck confit recipe from the Zuni Cafe Cookbook by Judy Rodgers has become my most beloved holiday meal.

 

Including this Thanksgiving I have made the entire traditional holiday meal for one of the wonderful families I have cooked for, five years running. That is a lot of turkey and I think I’m just kinda over serving turkey as a festive holiday feast for my family meals, so I have decided to bring on the duck confit! Don’t get me wrong, I like turkey and one of my favorite guilty pleasures, other than bean burritos on a soft flour tortilla, is a post Thanksgiving turkey sandwich: white meat, white bread, mayo, salt & pepper. This year Revivalist Kitchen hosted a Harvest Dinner, non-traditional take on Thanksgiving! Read all about what we served up up here.

 

I cook turkey on a regular basis for many clients and while my husband and I will eat turkey, rarely do I go out of my way to cook or eat it (collard green turkey enchiladas being a firm exception). The bonus here is the duck confit can be mostly prepared well ahead of time and only needs to be finished by warming & crisping up in a pan. The leftovers can be kept refrigerated submerged in cooking fat for long periods of time and that fat is a wonderful medium to roast & sauté other meats and vegetables. Leftover duck confit is a delicious Real Food answer to my appallingly pale colored turkey sandwiches of the past but I suspect this recipe is so good; there won’t be too many leftovers to speak of.

 

One of the best lunches of my life was with my then finance now husband Andrew at Zuni Cafe on a rainy San Francisco afternoon. We ate roast chicken and drank Burgundy and it was soul satisfyingly good eats. I have never had duck confit at Zuni Cafe but the recipe in Judy Rodgers life changing cook book is about as perfect as a recipe can get. This book was suggested to me as I was being rung up at a used bookstore in Hollywood by now obviously brilliant guy working the register. He saw my hodgepodge of books: a paperback filled with traditional Greek recipes, a banged up copy of Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone by Deborah Madison, and something by Alice Waters. The clerk at the bookstore grabbed the copy of the Zuni Cafe Cookbook that just happened to be within his arms reach and he said that I just had to get it. He sold me on the book long before I had heard of the legendary Zuni Cafe or the now departed Judy Rodgers, who sadly passed away from cancer in 2013.

 

Buying that book both simplified and elevated my cooking in a major way and I am very grateful to that dude for being a really great bookstore employee. I am also grateful to Judy Rodgers for writing her book, as I love what she shares, how she talks about her process of recipe development and how she tells her story. The best advice on properly seasoning and salting protein I have ever read came from that book and I was shocked to learn how much of a difference proper salting techniques can make in all dishes, not just confits and cures. So with deep respect to Judy Rodgers, here is her perfect recipe for duck confit. Her instructions are wonderful and I have paraphrased them here. I highly suggest you go out and buy or borrow a copy of this wonderful book and look at the full Zuni recipe for duck confit, as well as enjoy all the other cool ideas.

 

Duck Confit a la Judy for a party of 8

12 duck legs, approx ¾-1lb each preferably from McCall’s Meat & Fish if you live in SoCal

2 large 3.5lb buckets of duck fat

9T of salt: I used a combination of maldon flake and fine sea salt

 

This recipe clearly makes duck for a crowd: it can be scaled back following a ratio of 2tsp of salt per pound of duck legs and around 2 cups of fat per pound of meat. Duck fat is expensive so I try to buy the minimum amount I need just to cover all the duck legs.

 

Start this recipe at least two days before you want to serve it, but three is even better. Weigh duck legs and measure out salt. Trim any lose bits from the duck and pull out any feathers that may remain in the skin. Sprinkle the salt over the duck legs and massage in. Lay duck in one even layer and cover with plastic wrap (not foil as the salt can corrode aluminum, even in 24 hours.)

After 24 hours rinse salt off duck legs and gently massage the legs. Cut a slice of meat off the duck and fry it up in a little oil to test for salt. It should be salty but not crazy, crazy, salty. If it’s super gross salty rinse the duck legs again and repeat the test. Allow the meat to rest for another 24 hours to redistribute the salt.

To cook the duck, melt the fat in two large dutch ovens or sauce pans, add the duck legs and bring up to a simmer. I used my thermometer and tried to keep the heat around 200 degrees F, for an hour and a half. I was able to do that by having the burners on their lowest setting with the pots pushed all the way against the back of my stove versus directly over the center of the burner. The cooking is pretty much hands off, I stick my tongs to the bottom of the pot a few times to make sure nothing was stuck and potentially scorching and I push down a few stray legs that wanted to pop up out of the fat but otherwise I let the fat gently simmer and cook the meat until it was soft but not fall off the bone tender. You can also do the cooking in a crockpot, on the lowest setting for six hours, pull out early if meat starts to fall off the bone. Turn off the burners or crockpot and allow the meat to cool in the fat, then store in the fridge until ready to serve.

One hour before cooking the duck legs remove them from the fridge and let them get to room temperature. It works best to brown the duck in a medium not giant frying pan, around two to three at a time. Just make sure it’s one even layer and they don’t crowd each other. Pre-heat the oven to 220 to keep the duck warm as you finish the batches and turn the frying pan or pans up to medium high heat. Once the pan is heated pull your duck out of the fat and place directly into the hot pan, skin side down and allow to cook around 5-8 minutes. VERY CAREFULLY, using tongs and a spatula try to ease the duck up without damaging the skin and flip it over and cook an additional 4-5 minutes. If the duck skin resists, allow it to cook longer. Be very careful, the duck fat is hot grease it will spit and spatter a lot during cooking. The duck skin should be a burnished golden color with a crispy crust. Finish browning the rest of the duck and keep crisp duck warm in the oven until serving.

Leftover duck confit can be shredded and mixed with cooking fat and spices for a beautiful rillette, shredded as a wonderful addition to tacos or salads.

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

How did the recipe turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

Octavia Klein Photography

BFF diet free resource library

 

Keep on cooking!…Click through below for more real food recipes!

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Pumpkin Cupcakes

Pumpkin Cupcakes with Maple Cream Cheese Frosting

Tis’ pumpkin Season and with all the lovely visuals going around social media I got a mean craving for a pumpkin cupcake, but I did not want to blow my diet! So I knew in order to steer clear of refined white sugar and white flower I needed to come up with my own recipe.

Pumpkin Cream Cheese Cupcakes. Grain Free, refined sugar free, gluten free. Click through to read recipe!

 

The base of my creation was inspired from Erin’s Birthday Cupcakes! Really I just needed to add pumpkin, pumpkin pie spice (which I blended myself from a Betty Crocker recipe) and a little more coconut flour to thicken it up.

For the frosting it was super easy just organic cream cheese with maple sugar and a little raw cream to thin it out.

These cupcakes turned out amazing! My friend Mike said so many cupcakes the frosting overtakes the cake, but he said mine were a perfect balance! Hey! Now that’s a perfect compliment!

Pumpkin Cupcake Recipe

1 Tsp Baking soda

1 Tsp Sea Salt

2 Tsp Pumpkin pie spice

1 Tsp Vanilla

1C Coconut flower

9 Eggs

1/4 C Coconut oil

1 C Coconut Sugar

1C Pumpkin Puree*

First, pre-heat oven to 350°. In a blender, pulverize the coconut sugar until fine. If coconut oil is solid, gently warm until liquid, but not hot.

I found this super easy to do with two mixing bowls and a hand mixer, but a stand mixer would also work.

Whip the coconut oil and pulverize coconut sugar until combined. Add vanilla extract and pumpkin puree. Break all the eggs together first and then incorporate into mixture, one at a time to incorporate each egg. When all the eggs are added, blend until creamy.

Sift the coconut flour into another bowl and add the salt, pumpkin pie spice & baking soda. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and blend. Line a cupcake pan with un-dyed parchment muffin liners and scoop in 1/4 C of the batter to each one, an ice-cream scoop works well for this. Conveniently this recipe makes 12 cupcakes, perfect for a traditional muffin pan. Put cupcakes in oven on the middle rack and set your oven timer for 10 minutes. After 10, turn the tray in the oven, keeping them on the same oven sheet and bake another 15 minutes. Making total bake time a total of 25 minutes. Ovens vary, but after the first 10 minutes the cupcakes should be firming up and lightly browning at the edges. The middles will still look a little soupy. After the pan rotation and 10 more minutes the cupcakes will be just cooked and not dry or heavy. Do not over-bake! Use the timer or they won’t turn out well. Allow all cupcakes to fully cool before attempting to frost. Cupcakes can be frozen but will dry out a bit.

*For the pumpkin puree you can use canned, but I personally don’t like canned food. So I roasted fresh pumpkin in the oven and pureed it myself. Set oven on 400°, slice open pumpkin, scoop out the guts, reserve the pumpkin seeds to roast later. Then cut into 4-5” square chunks and roast for 20-30 minutes until soft. Let them cool and then spoon out all the meat from the skin and puree in blender.

Octavia Klein Photography

Maple Cream Cheese Frosting

1 Package organic cream cheese

½ C Maple sugar

¼ C Raw Cream

 

Let the cream cheese get to room temperature. Then pulverize the maple sugar in a blender­–I used my Magic Bullet. Then add all ingredients in a bowl and blend with hand mixer. If it’s too thick still just add a bit more cream. After frosting my cupcakes I dusted the tops with cinnamon.

Octavia Klein Photography

 

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

How did the recipe turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

BFF diet free resource library

Keep on cooking!…Click through below for more real food recipes!

Brussels Sprout Salad, Vegan, plant based, delicious salad. By Revivalist Kitchen!

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Revivalist Kitchen’s Christmas Cassoulet, yummy french traditional cuisine, made with fresh whole food ingredients!

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Fermented Pear Chutney

2015_RK-1282BB

Beef Bone Broth