Celery Root Puree

Celery Root Puree

Celery root is one ugly vegetable that hides its true beauty in a creepy, hairy skin. I learned about the joys of celery root during my time working in a French restaurant that featured the root, also know as celeriac in creamy soups, in a raw aioli dressed salad they called celery root remoulade and also in a buttery rich celery root puree.

We served this yummy celery root puree at our Revivalist Kitchen Harvest Dinner. Read all about that beautiful meal here!

Celery Root Puree, gluten free, low glycemic, Paleo & GAPS diet friendly. By Revivalist Kitchen!

When purchasing celery roots select firm roots that are heavy for their size, when past their prime celery roots can get spongy on the inside and that is not very nice. I usually don’t mess around with the bumpy skin on the bottom of the root and slice the bottom of the root off and then peel the rest with a vegetable peeler. Like an apple, once peeled celery roots begin to oxidize so to prevent browning hold peeled celery root in acidulated water (a bowl of water with a large squeeze of lemon or splash of vinegar).

 

Adding celery root to a pot of mashed potato is a great intro but this creamy smooth puree is a wonderful introduction to this under appreciated vegetable.

Celery Root Puree, gluten free, low glycemic, Paleo & GAPS diet friendly. By Revivalist Kitchen!

Ingredients:

2 celery roots, peeled and cut into even pieces.

1 Tp white pepper (I love white pepper but it can be spicy, use caution)

1 Tp salt

1 stick of butter

Up to 1/4 C cream, as desired to texture.

 

Cook celery root in salted water until soft. Drain and add to blender with butter, salt and white pepper and blend. If the mixture needs some additional liquid to start the blending process add a splash of cream. Taste for seasoning and if you like a thinner puree add the rest of the cream. A puree of just the vegetables will be sturdier but I like it creamy and light, yet still thick enough to hold together on the plate. Serve warm.

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

How did the recipe turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

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Sautéed Mushrooms

Mushrooms

Mushrooms and I have enjoyed a whirlwind love affair that has simmered down into a warm fuzzy appreciation. As a kid I would not touch a mushroom for money and the idea of consuming a fungus on purpose completely grossed me out. Times have changed and it was a creamy mushroom pasta that first helped me leave my childhood mushroom hating foolishness in the past, mushroom pizza’s inspired the first flickers of a crush and it was perfectly sautéed mushrooms over a steak that finally ignited my obsession.

 

Now I eat mushrooms pretty much every day, mainly the humble brown cremini. I like them all different ways in soups, as side dishes and in sauces. You will never see me pass up an opportunity up to peruse the mushroom stand at the farmers market. Foraging for my own mushrooms is a dream that I hope to pursue as soon as I find a willing guide, but for now I must be content just to enjoy cooking, eating and sharing the shroomy love.

 

I eat mushrooms because, they taste awesome, but they are also super nutritious! Not only are mushrooms powerful antioxidants they are loaded with selenium, folate and vitamin D. Mushrooms are the perfect assistant to our bodies way of repairing itself: nourishing our cells, DNA and liver. Depending on the variety, certain mushrooms are recognized for powerful medicinal properties, but like anything with the power to heal, mushrooms also have the power to hurt: so never eat a mushroom you are not sure is safe. That said, fall is a great time to dive into the land of cultivated and wild mushrooms and this easy recipe will be an elegant side dish for your holiday meal. We served these delicious sautéed mushrooms with our Revivalist Kitchen Harvest Dinner. Read all about that lovely meal here!

Ingredients

2 pounds assorted mushrooms of your choice: I used 1.5 lbs of cremini, bunashimeji also know as brown beech and king oyster mushrooms

6 Tablespoons butter

1 tsp sea salt

Chopped parsley or chives for garnish

Octavia Klein Photography

 

Wipe the cremini mushrooms off with a damp towel and trim the stems. Cut the base off the bunch of bunashimejis to free them from the clump they are usually sold in and trim the bottom cut end of the king oysters. Cut the cremini’s into even sized wedges, depending on the size quarters or sixths usually works for me. Rough chop the bunashimejis and slice the king oysters.

 

Warm a large saute pan over medium high heat. When hot, add the cremini mushrooms first, then the butter & salt and allow to cook, stirring occasionally. To get a nice brown crust on the mushrooms they need to be cooked in one layer in a pan large enough so they are not over crowded. Mushrooms contain a lot of moisture and you want to let the moisture be released and evaporate. Once the creminis have began to color add the other mushrooms and sauté until brown, about 5-8 minutes. Top with herbs to serve.

 

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

How did the recipe turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

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Pumpkin Custard

Pumpkin Custard

I am officially over pumpkin spice everything but even during these times of severe pumpkin abuse, I just cannot resist making a few pumpkin desserts, like this delicious pumpkin custard. While I could house an entire pumpkin pie and call Thanksgiving done and dusted, in honor of Revivalist Kitchen this recipe was created to feature a not over sweetened, reasonably spiced dessert that is the perfect end to a rich meal but with the liberal use of farm fresh eggs, a slightly larger portion could be a nutritious and satisfying cap on a lighter meal. Featuring fresh roasted pumpkin, creamy naturally sweet raw whipped cream and spiced pumpkin seeds; this pumpkin custard will make a beautiful addition to your holiday table. We featured this desert at our Harvest Dinner. Read all bout what we served up here!

Octavia Klein Photography

Pumpkin Custard

2 cups pumpkin puree

1/2 Cup Coconut Sugar

1 T Molasses

1 Tsp fresh grated nutmeg

1 Tsp fresh grated cinnamon

1 Tsp vanilla, scraped from vanilla bean

8 Eggs

1/2 Cup Milk or if Paleo use coconut Milk

1/4 tsp Sea Salt

Pumpkin Custard! Gluten free & refined sugar free! Traditional food & Paleo friendly recipe! Click through to get recipe.

Pumpkin Custard

Roast the pumpkins in 350° oven until soft. Scoop out flesh, reserving seeds to be toasted and blend all ingredients in food processor, except for eggs. Pour blended mixture into heavy bottom saucepan over medium heat. Taste for seasoning and turn off heat once mixture is at a simmer. Off the heat whisk in the eggs one at a time and then bring the mixture back up to a simmer. Pour into individual serving vessels and chill in refrigerator. Top custard with raw whipped cream and the toasted spiced pumpkin seeds.

 

Toasted spiced pumpkin seeds

1 C pumpkin seeds, rinsed

1 2 T coconut sugar

1/4 tsp each cinnamon & nutmeg

2T melted butter

1 tsp sea salt

Octavia Klein Photography

 

Pre-heat the oven to 300°. Mix together all ingredients except seeds, once mixed, toss in pumpkin seeds. Spread seeds over a baking sheet and bake. You will want to stir the seeds every five minutes and bake until crispy. This process takes about 25-35 minutes.

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

How did the recipe turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

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 Keep on cooking!…Click through below for more real food recipes!

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Duck Confit

Duck Confit

Octavia Klein Photography

Eating duck for the first time was not the most memorable experience of my culinary life, while eating duck confit for the first time will forever be seared into my brain. It was, Walter Manske’s, duck confit at Church & State that did me in. I was a server there and had the good fortune of being handed the remnants of a crispy golden duck leg by another server, to wolf down as we stood near the dish tank, hovering over the garbage cans. Holy cow, that duck was good.

 

Next time I had duck confit, I actually ate it off a plate and the crispy outside and meltingly tender inside was accompanied by a chutney like fruit sauce. It took a good duck confit for me to get duck. Never being blown away with duck breast, I have had duck dishes other than confit that I enjoyed: chef Ericka Lins formerly of Campanile, makes a wicked duck meatball, the duck pancakes at Chi Dynasty in Los Feliz are tasty other than that I don’t really go out of my way to make, buy or order duck. The exception is duck confit for me, and the duck confit recipe from the Zuni Cafe Cookbook by Judy Rodgers has become my most beloved holiday meal.

 

Including this Thanksgiving I have made the entire traditional holiday meal for one of the wonderful families I have cooked for, five years running. That is a lot of turkey and I think I’m just kinda over serving turkey as a festive holiday feast for my family meals, so I have decided to bring on the duck confit! Don’t get me wrong, I like turkey and one of my favorite guilty pleasures, other than bean burritos on a soft flour tortilla, is a post Thanksgiving turkey sandwich: white meat, white bread, mayo, salt & pepper. This year Revivalist Kitchen hosted a Harvest Dinner, non-traditional take on Thanksgiving! Read all about what we served up up here.

 

I cook turkey on a regular basis for many clients and while my husband and I will eat turkey, rarely do I go out of my way to cook or eat it (collard green turkey enchiladas being a firm exception). The bonus here is the duck confit can be mostly prepared well ahead of time and only needs to be finished by warming & crisping up in a pan. The leftovers can be kept refrigerated submerged in cooking fat for long periods of time and that fat is a wonderful medium to roast & sauté other meats and vegetables. Leftover duck confit is a delicious Real Food answer to my appallingly pale colored turkey sandwiches of the past but I suspect this recipe is so good; there won’t be too many leftovers to speak of.

 

One of the best lunches of my life was with my then finance now husband Andrew at Zuni Cafe on a rainy San Francisco afternoon. We ate roast chicken and drank Burgundy and it was soul satisfyingly good eats. I have never had duck confit at Zuni Cafe but the recipe in Judy Rodgers life changing cook book is about as perfect as a recipe can get. This book was suggested to me as I was being rung up at a used bookstore in Hollywood by now obviously brilliant guy working the register. He saw my hodgepodge of books: a paperback filled with traditional Greek recipes, a banged up copy of Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone by Deborah Madison, and something by Alice Waters. The clerk at the bookstore grabbed the copy of the Zuni Cafe Cookbook that just happened to be within his arms reach and he said that I just had to get it. He sold me on the book long before I had heard of the legendary Zuni Cafe or the now departed Judy Rodgers, who sadly passed away from cancer in 2013.

 

Buying that book both simplified and elevated my cooking in a major way and I am very grateful to that dude for being a really great bookstore employee. I am also grateful to Judy Rodgers for writing her book, as I love what she shares, how she talks about her process of recipe development and how she tells her story. The best advice on properly seasoning and salting protein I have ever read came from that book and I was shocked to learn how much of a difference proper salting techniques can make in all dishes, not just confits and cures. So with deep respect to Judy Rodgers, here is her perfect recipe for duck confit. Her instructions are wonderful and I have paraphrased them here. I highly suggest you go out and buy or borrow a copy of this wonderful book and look at the full Zuni recipe for duck confit, as well as enjoy all the other cool ideas.

 

Duck Confit a la Judy for a party of 8

12 duck legs, approx ¾-1lb each preferably from McCall’s Meat & Fish if you live in SoCal

2 large 3.5lb buckets of duck fat

9T of salt: I used a combination of maldon flake and fine sea salt

 

This recipe clearly makes duck for a crowd: it can be scaled back following a ratio of 2tsp of salt per pound of duck legs and around 2 cups of fat per pound of meat. Duck fat is expensive so I try to buy the minimum amount I need just to cover all the duck legs.

 

Start this recipe at least two days before you want to serve it, but three is even better. Weigh duck legs and measure out salt. Trim any lose bits from the duck and pull out any feathers that may remain in the skin. Sprinkle the salt over the duck legs and massage in. Lay duck in one even layer and cover with plastic wrap (not foil as the salt can corrode aluminum, even in 24 hours.)

After 24 hours rinse salt off duck legs and gently massage the legs. Cut a slice of meat off the duck and fry it up in a little oil to test for salt. It should be salty but not crazy, crazy, salty. If it’s super gross salty rinse the duck legs again and repeat the test. Allow the meat to rest for another 24 hours to redistribute the salt.

To cook the duck, melt the fat in two large dutch ovens or sauce pans, add the duck legs and bring up to a simmer. I used my thermometer and tried to keep the heat around 200 degrees F, for an hour and a half. I was able to do that by having the burners on their lowest setting with the pots pushed all the way against the back of my stove versus directly over the center of the burner. The cooking is pretty much hands off, I stick my tongs to the bottom of the pot a few times to make sure nothing was stuck and potentially scorching and I push down a few stray legs that wanted to pop up out of the fat but otherwise I let the fat gently simmer and cook the meat until it was soft but not fall off the bone tender. You can also do the cooking in a crockpot, on the lowest setting for six hours, pull out early if meat starts to fall off the bone. Turn off the burners or crockpot and allow the meat to cool in the fat, then store in the fridge until ready to serve.

One hour before cooking the duck legs remove them from the fridge and let them get to room temperature. It works best to brown the duck in a medium not giant frying pan, around two to three at a time. Just make sure it’s one even layer and they don’t crowd each other. Pre-heat the oven to 220 to keep the duck warm as you finish the batches and turn the frying pan or pans up to medium high heat. Once the pan is heated pull your duck out of the fat and place directly into the hot pan, skin side down and allow to cook around 5-8 minutes. VERY CAREFULLY, using tongs and a spatula try to ease the duck up without damaging the skin and flip it over and cook an additional 4-5 minutes. If the duck skin resists, allow it to cook longer. Be very careful, the duck fat is hot grease it will spit and spatter a lot during cooking. The duck skin should be a burnished golden color with a crispy crust. Finish browning the rest of the duck and keep crisp duck warm in the oven until serving.

Leftover duck confit can be shredded and mixed with cooking fat and spices for a beautiful rillette, shredded as a wonderful addition to tacos or salads.

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

How did the recipe turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

Octavia Klein Photography

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Pumpkin Cupcakes

Pumpkin Cupcakes with Maple Cream Cheese Frosting

Tis’ pumpkin Season and with all the lovely visuals going around social media I got a mean craving for a pumpkin cupcake, but I did not want to blow my diet! So I knew in order to steer clear of refined white sugar and white flower I needed to come up with my own recipe.

Pumpkin Cream Cheese Cupcakes. Grain Free, refined sugar free, gluten free. Click through to read recipe!

 

The base of my creation was inspired from Erin’s Birthday Cupcakes! Really I just needed to add pumpkin, pumpkin pie spice (which I blended myself from a Betty Crocker recipe) and a little more coconut flour to thicken it up.

For the frosting it was super easy just organic cream cheese with maple sugar and a little raw cream to thin it out.

These cupcakes turned out amazing! My friend Mike said so many cupcakes the frosting overtakes the cake, but he said mine were a perfect balance! Hey! Now that’s a perfect compliment!

Pumpkin Cupcake Recipe

1 Tsp Baking soda

1 Tsp Sea Salt

2 Tsp Pumpkin pie spice

1 Tsp Vanilla

1C Coconut flower

9 Eggs

1/4 C Coconut oil

1 C Coconut Sugar

1C Pumpkin Puree*

First, pre-heat oven to 350°. In a blender, pulverize the coconut sugar until fine. If coconut oil is solid, gently warm until liquid, but not hot.

I found this super easy to do with two mixing bowls and a hand mixer, but a stand mixer would also work.

Whip the coconut oil and pulverize coconut sugar until combined. Add vanilla extract and pumpkin puree. Break all the eggs together first and then incorporate into mixture, one at a time to incorporate each egg. When all the eggs are added, blend until creamy.

Sift the coconut flour into another bowl and add the salt, pumpkin pie spice & baking soda. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and blend. Line a cupcake pan with un-dyed parchment muffin liners and scoop in 1/4 C of the batter to each one, an ice-cream scoop works well for this. Conveniently this recipe makes 12 cupcakes, perfect for a traditional muffin pan. Put cupcakes in oven on the middle rack and set your oven timer for 10 minutes. After 10, turn the tray in the oven, keeping them on the same oven sheet and bake another 15 minutes. Making total bake time a total of 25 minutes. Ovens vary, but after the first 10 minutes the cupcakes should be firming up and lightly browning at the edges. The middles will still look a little soupy. After the pan rotation and 10 more minutes the cupcakes will be just cooked and not dry or heavy. Do not over-bake! Use the timer or they won’t turn out well. Allow all cupcakes to fully cool before attempting to frost. Cupcakes can be frozen but will dry out a bit.

*For the pumpkin puree you can use canned, but I personally don’t like canned food. So I roasted fresh pumpkin in the oven and pureed it myself. Set oven on 400°, slice open pumpkin, scoop out the guts, reserve the pumpkin seeds to roast later. Then cut into 4-5” square chunks and roast for 20-30 minutes until soft. Let them cool and then spoon out all the meat from the skin and puree in blender.

Octavia Klein Photography

Maple Cream Cheese Frosting

1 Package organic cream cheese

½ C Maple sugar

¼ C Raw Cream

 

Let the cream cheese get to room temperature. Then pulverize the maple sugar in a blender­–I used my Magic Bullet. Then add all ingredients in a bowl and blend with hand mixer. If it’s too thick still just add a bit more cream. After frosting my cupcakes I dusted the tops with cinnamon.

Octavia Klein Photography

 

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

How did the recipe turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

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Caramel Corn

Caramel Corn

We all love caramel corn, but as a kid, due to some dental misfortune, I had silver caps on all of my teeth. This led to my parents being very careful about what I ate, fearing I would damage my shiny chompers. Sticky caramel was for the most part off the table, leading me (of course) to develop a lifelong affinity for the stuff. At that time the mysteries of caramel never compelled me to look farther past the sticky substance wrapped in cellophane papers made by Brach that was quickly confiscated from my plastic trick or treat pumpkin. Post baby teeth, but not many Halloween’s later, I decided to make caramel apples and bring them to school for my class.

Making caramel for the first time I did not need to consult a recipe, I just unwrapped around 100 little squares of purchased caramel and melted them, but I had a pot of caramel filled with unknown ingredients that took forever to make, while driving me crazy. At the time I just figured that caramel apples were way too much of a pain in the booty and while they sure were tasty, not worth the trouble. However, caramel is really just melted cooked sugar. For the kid in us all, I have adapted my forbidden childhood sweets into a real food Halloween treat that features organic popcorn, pistachios and a spiced up coconut sugar caramel made with grass-fed butter. A spicy-sweet treat without scary, tricky ingredients.

Octavia Klein Photography

 

Recipe:

1 C unpopped popcorn

2 C Coconut Sugar

1 C Butter

1 T Sea Salt for caramel, additional salt to finish.

1 tsp cayenne

1/8 tsp vanilla

1/2 cup toasted chopped pistachios

 

Prepare popcorn either in air popper or on the stovetop. To make popcorn on the stovetop use a dutch oven or other heavy bottomed large pot with a lid and warm over medium to medium high heat. Coat the bottom with a little heat friendly oil or ghee. Once the pan is warmed put in three popcorn kernels and close lid and allow to pop. If kernels look over browned turn pot down. If they took forever to pop and came out soggy, then turn down the heat. Remove those three kernels and add the rest of the popcorn and cover with lid. Once the popcorn begins to pop vigorously I crack the lid a tiny bit to let excess steam out and keep popcorn crisp. You will also want to continuously shake the pot so that they kernels don’t stick and burn. Once the popping seems to be slowing down turn off the heat and leave it covered for a moment so stray pops don’t shoot popcorn all over your kitchen, then transfer to a large mixing bowl to cool.

Make caramel by heating butter and coconut sugar together over low heat. When sugar melts add salt, vanilla and cayenne and turn up heat to medium high, bring mixture up to a boil and cook for 10 minutes, stirring frequently so mixture doesn’t burn. Caramel should smell awesome and look thick and bubbly.

Octavia Klein Photography

While cooking caramel you can prepare your pistachios. A lot of bulk bins at major markets sell pistachio meats out of the shell. If you buy these they will probably be un-toasted so you will want to put them in a 350 degree oven for around 12 minutes to toast, stirring occasionally. Or you can do what I had to do with my last batch of caramel corn and shell toasted and salted pistachios. If toasting your own pistachios you may want to add more salt to the caramel. No matter your method, after toasting or shelling place your pistachios in a dishtowel and rub the majority of the skins off the nuts. You may want to work in handful-sized batches at a time and rub until at least the larger loose chunks of the papery skin are removed. Roughly chop the pistachios and reserve.

Octavia Klein Photography

Be careful to let caramel cool to a reasonably warm not scalding temperature before adding to the popcorn so you don’t burn yourself. It helps to have another person to toss the caramel corn as you slowly pour the caramel over popcorn to ensure it is evenly coated. Next add pistachios, sprinkle with additional salt and toss mixture gently. Using your perfectly clean hands make balls out of the mixture, I think large fist sized caramel corn balls are the best. This caramel corn will keep well tightly covered in a cool dry place for a few days.

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

Coconut Sugar Carmel Corn! Gluten free & refined sugar free! Traditional food & Paleo friendly recipe! Click through to get recipe.

Carmel Corn

How did the recipe turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

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Birthday Cupcakes

Birthday Cupcakes

Octavia Klein Photography

Some of my most vivid memories from childhood storybooks are food related. I’ve always  been particularly fascinated by the seemingly ubiquitous pink layer cake with a berry or cherry or whatever on top. Strawberry Shortcake, the book about the school teacher elephant who lives the good life in her classroom, after hours, has a particularly inspiring bathtub tea party picture that as I recall featured pink cakes. 

Octavia Klein Photography

This year my birthday falls on a Friday and I teach a 10:15am spin class in Silverlake. As bribery to my friends and students for coming out to ride with me for my birthday class, I used the fantasy cake from my childhood to create a tasty example of 80/20. The cupcakes are a sweet treat but not junk food and the pink comes in the form of my personal favorite: cream cheese frosting. As an adult who is very into fitness and wanted a cupcake I felt good about feeding to a room full of people after they just exercised for 45 minutes, I kept away from some of the higher glycemic ingredients: refined wheat flour & white sugar. Coconut came to the rescue here and gave the cake a nice fluffy texture while providing protein & fat. A whole bunch of eggs boost the protein content and give the cupcakes some serious richness and contribute to their golden color. 

Birthday Cupcakes with Pink Frosting *grain free, dairy free*

3/4 Cup Coconut flour

1/4 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp sea salt

1/4 tsp vanilla powder

1 cup coconut sugar

1/4 cup coconut oil 

9 large eggs

Pre-Heat oven to 350 degrees. In a blender, pulverize the coconut sugar until fine. If coconut oil is solid, gently warm until liquid, but not hot. I found this super easy to do with two mixing bowls and a hand mixer, but a stand mixer would also work. If you are looking for an upper body workout, you could do it by hand.

Whip the coconut oil and pulverize coconut sugar until combined. Break all the eggs together and mix into the coconut oil and sugar, one at a time to incorporate each egg. When all the eggs are added, blend until creamy. Sift the coconut flour into another bowl and add the salt, vanilla & baking soda. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and blend. Line a cupcake pan with undyed parchment muffin liners and scoop in 1/4 C of the batter to each one, an ice-cream scoop works well for this. Conveniently this recipe makes 12 cupcakes. Bake the cupcakes for 20 minutes. Set your oven timer for 10 minutes. After 10, turn the tray in the oven, keeping on the same oven sheet and bake another 10 minutes. Ovens vary, but after the first 10 minutes the cupcakes should be firming up and lightly browning at the edges. The middles will still be kinda soupy. After the pan rotation and 10 more minutes the cupcakes will be just cooked and not dry or heavy. Do not over-bake! Use the timer. Or they will suck. Allow all cupcakes to fully cool before attempting to frost. Cupcakes can be frozen but will dry out a bit. I plan to leave them to cool and store on the counter overnight, unfrosted and have zero leftovers as I only made 12

Birthday Cupcakes! Grain free, gluten free, refined sugar free, protein packed, made with whole food ingredients. Click through to read recipe.

Pink Strawberry Frosting 

 1.2 oz freeze dried unsweetened strawberries

1/4 C Coconut Sugar

2 blocks full fat cream cheese, room temperature 

1/4 to 1 C heavy cream (start with 1/4 C increase in incremeants until consistency is acheived)

One at a time pulverize the strawberries and coconut sugar in a blender until fine. Beware of breathing in a strawberry  and/or coconut sugar dust cloud when opening lid. In a deep bowl whip together the strawberry powder, fine coconut sugar and cream cheese. This may make a tiny mess but don’t sweat it. Thin the mixture with the cream and it will also help keep your frosting in the bowl. Whip it up until it’s fluffy. Boom! Pink frosting for any occasion.

 

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

How did the recipe turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

BFF diet free resource library

Keep on cooking!…Click through below for more real food recipes!

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Fish Broth

Fish Broth

Unlike meat & poultry stock, fish broth is quick to make from start to finish. Using milder flavored fish such as cod, bass, snapper, sea bream or branzino, make the best broths in my opinion. I find broth made from oily fish way to strong for my tastes. The heads, collars, and bones make a gelatinous broth that can be used to cook legumes, (I cook lentils in fish broth and serve with the filets of the fish I reserve and pan sear) or used as the base of a soup or sauce. Shrimp, crab and lobsters shells are a great flavorful addition to fish broth and are an economical way to get the most out of your fish counter investments. I always look for wild caught fish from abundant species. Bright eyes and red gills are a sign of freshness but I usually ask to give the fish a sniff before it’s wrapped up. Your friendly fish monger may also be willing to save you bones from whole fish they break down into filets, so go ahead and ask and you may even score some for free.

 

Octavia Klein Photography

Fish Broth

1 whole fish, gutted with head and tail intact (around 2 pounds)

Fresh clean water, around 2 quarts

Aromatics such as bay leaves, peppercorns, and my personal fave, fresh horseradish

1 carrot

1 onion

2 stalks of celery

2T sea salt

 

Add ingredients to pot and bring up to a simmer. If using whole fish, after 15 minutes pull out fish and remove cooked meat. Return bones to pot, add additional ingredients and simmer 30-45 minutes more, strain and reserve broth.

 

Gelatinous Fish Bone Broth and Erin's fish soup recipe. Paleo, GAPS, AIP, & Ketogenic diet friendly! Click through to access your FREE bone broth tutorial video!

 

Erin’s Favorite Fish Soup

1 whole tai snapper or black cod, cooked according to above directions. Cooked broth & fish reserved.

2 leeks. on the smaller side

2 carrots, peeled and sliced

1 small bulb fennel, chopped

2 Tablespoons grated fresh horseradish root (but feel free to go nuts or scale back depending on your horseradish tolerance) ginger is a good substitute here if horseradish is not your jam.

2T celtic sea salt (I love my salt)

 

Cut leeks down the middle and rinse away any dirt or grit. If leeks are really dirty, rinse then slice leeks halves again, chop leeks roughly and put into a bowl of water, leeks will float & dirt will sink. Skim leeks off the surface of the water (don’t dump into strainer as all the dirt will just go back on top of your leeks). Peel and grate your horseradish root. Bring your strained fish broth up to a simmer and add the sea salt, carrots, fennel, leeks and horseradish. Taste for seasoning and adjust if necessary. Simmer until leeks look translucent and vegetables are soft. Add reserved fish, return to simmer for one minute and serve. Soup can be finished with more grated horseradish and some chopped fennel fronds.

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

How did the recipe turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

BFF diet free resource library

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Revivalist Kitchen’s Christmas Cassoulet, yummy french traditional cuisine, made with fresh whole food ingredients!

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Roasted Fig Kefir Ice-cream

Roasted Fig Kefir Ice-cream

Done right, ice-cream can be elevated from the realms of guilty pleasure into a satisfying and health boosting treat.

Roasted Fig Kefir Ice-Cream Probiotic. Fermented Raw Cream. Click through to read recipe.

My little Cuisinart ice-cream maker has been one kitchen purchase that has earned it’s meager investment back multiple times over. As a home ice-cream maker with a non-commercial device the number one thing we need to focus on is reducing any water in our ice-cream base to prevent icy crystals from destroying the texture of your dessert. By roasting the figs for this ice-cream, some of the water in them evaporates, the flavor is concentrated and the texture of the figs become meltingly soft.

Octavia Klein Photography

For a probiotic boost I used raw cream that I left out overnight with milk kefir grains. The texture of kefir-ed cream is thick and luscious lending a slight tang to the finished ice-cream and turning  it into a powerful probiotic. Roasted Fig Ice-cream

 

Recipe

1 Quart Raw Cream, left to ferment overnight with kefir grains (if substituting pasteurized milk do not ferment)

3 raw egg yolks from happy pastured chickens (eggs must be from a reputable supplier you trust)

1/2 cup raw honey

1/2 pound of fresh mission figs

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

1/2 teaspoon ground vanilla

1 tablesppon butter

Pre-heat oven to 425. Quarter figs and mix with butter and roast for 15 minutes, stirring gently every 5 minutes. Figs should still hold their shape when finished but will look jammy and smell very rich and figgy. Remove figs from pan and allow to cool completely (this step can be done the day before).

Put all other ingredients into blender and pulse a few times until combined. Do not run the blender longer than you need as your cream can begin to lump up and get buttery in a bad way.

Octavia Klein Photography

Make sure the ice-cream maker is on and turing before adding the mixture! Pour the blended ice-cream base into your running ice-cream maker and allow to freeze according to your makers directions.

Octavia Klein Photography

Watch carefully, if you over freeze this ice-cream it takes on a cheesy consistency that I find unpleasant. When it looks like the texture of soft serve, quickly remove from ice-cream maker insert, gently mix in cooled figs, then put in freezer and  allow to freeze.

Octavia Klein PhotographyOctavia Klein Photography

This recipe is the perfect way to finish a fall meal and healthy enough to be enjoyed any time with the only guilt you have to feel is if you just refuse to share.

Roasted Fig Kefir Ice-Cream Probiotic. Fermented Raw Cream. Click through to read recipe.

© Copyright 2015 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

How did the recipe turn out? Got any questions? Leave a comment below!

 BFF diet free resource library

Keep on cooking!…Click through below for more real food recipes!

Pumpkin Custard

Pumpkin Custard

Octavia Klein Photography

Pumpkin Cupcakes

Smoothies

Smoothies

Kombucha Jello

Kombucha Jello