Buttery Black Cod & Veggies

Buttery Black Cod & Veggies

Buttery Black Cod & Veggies! Super yummy low carb meal that's packed with nutrients! This meal is BFF Diet, Paleo, AIP, Ketogenic, & Traditional Foods friendly! Click through for recipe!

Buttery Black Cod & Veggies is a perfect BFF diet approved meal! It is so easy to feel discouraged at the fish counter these days. Concerns over mercury, high prices, sustainability and freshness can make it easy to just wheel your shopping cart past without a second look. However, the health benefits that come from eating fish are too big to pass up and it is so worth the effort to make fish a regular part of your diet. High levels of DHA and EPA, the omega-3 fatty acids that reduce inflammation and nourish our brains, are found in fish and other seafoods.

 

Black cod, along with many other types of fish contain high levels of protein, vitamins and minerals like selenium, which can protect us from the harmful effects of mercury. Gut health also has an important role to play in protecting us from the mercury that we consume along with our fish dinners, so remember those probiotics.

 

To pick fish the Revivalist Kitchen way, make sure that you purchase from a reputable supplier you trust and opt for local, wild caught fish low in the food chain. It’s the large predatory fish, like tuna, that have the highest levels of mercury. Big fish like tuna and swordfish should be eaten in moderation while itty-bitty sardines can be eaten with abandon.

 

As far as sustainability goes, the Monterey Bay Aquarium has a great little chart that you can print out for your reference to bring along when you shop. While we consider sardines a BFF Diet superstar food, the humble little fish are not always gonna cut it and that is when some of our other favorites, like a tasty filet of buttery rich black cod, gets to step up and shine.

 

Black cod is not actually a member of the cod family at all and can also be called sablefish. There is also a Hawaiian preparation of miso glazed black cod that is called butterfish, but be sure that if you see butterfish on the menu you know exactly what you are getting. Escolar can also be called butterfish, or white tuna, and that is not a BFF Diet approved fish, as it can cause some very unpleasant digestive side effects. So now that you know what you are looking for, go check your market and see if you can buy yourself a nice piece of black cod. A fresh piece of fish and a few veggies are all it takes to make a tasty, nourishing dinner that is ready in a snap. Make this buttery black cod & veggies a complete BFF meal by adding a spoonful of kraut on the side and enjoy with a mug of nourishing bone broth.

Buttery Black Cod & Veggies

Buttery Black Cod & Veggies! Super yummy low carb meal that's packed with nutrients! This meal is BFF Diet, Paleo, AIP, Ketogenic, & Traditional Foods friendly! Click through for recipe!

12oz black cod filet, cut into 4 equal size pieces
1/2 C sliced shiitake mushroom
1/4 C butter
Sea salt to taste
1 sliced red bell pepper
1 large bunch baby broccoli, approx 8oz
1 yellow onion
1 large juicy lemon

Prepare your vegetables by chopping the onion, bell pepper and broccolini into even bite-sized pieces. Heat two heavy wide bottomed pans over medium-high heat.

Wipe down the shiitake mushrooms, cut off the woody stems and slice. Add the mushrooms to one pan along with the butter, reserving about one tablespoon. Add the veggies and the remaining butter to the other pan, along with a sprinkle of salt, we use about 1/2tsp.

Move the mushrooms to the outer perimeter of the pan and add the black cod, skin side up. Allow the fish to cook for 3 minutes and then flip the fish over so the skin side is down.

Stir the veggies in the other pan and check for doneness.

Buttery Black Cod & Veggies! Super yummy low carb meal that's packed with nutrients! This meal is BFF Diet, Paleo, AIP, Ketogenic, & Traditional Foods friendly! Click through for recipe!

Using a long handled spoon if you have one, or a short handled one and a pot holder baste the mushrooms and butter over the fish by gently tilting up the pan and scooping the liquid over the fish. The mushrooms should begin to look golden brown and the fish should have crispy skin after 8-10 minutes, while the vegetables in the other pan should be cooked.

Turn off the heat on the pan with the vegetables when they are done and reserve. Depending on the thickness, the fish may be cooked through at this point or it may need a few more minutes. If the fish needs a little longer you can flip it over one more time and continue the cooking process for 3-5 more minutes.

Buttery Black Cod & Veggies! Super yummy low carb meal that's packed with nutrients! This meal is BFF Diet, Paleo, AIP, Ketogenic, & Traditional Foods friendly! Click through for recipe!

To serve pile the vegetables in the center of your plate, top with a piece of fish seasoned with a generous squeeze of lemon and healthy pinch of your favorite sea salt. There will be one line of medium sized bones running down the center of the fish filet that are very easy to remove from the cooked fish, so you may want to warn your fellow diners. Unlike fish with hazardous tiny bones, these are really easy to avoid eating, so I don’t bother to bust out the tweezers to debone ahead of time.

Buttery Black Cod & Veggies! Super yummy low carb meal that's packed with nutrients! This meal is BFF Diet, Paleo, AIP, Ketogenic, & Traditional Foods friendly! Click through for recipe!

©Revivalist Kitchen 2016. All rights reserved.

Buttery Black Cod & Veggies! Super yummy low carb meal that's packed with nutrients! This meal is BFF Diet, Paleo, AIP, Ketogenic, & Traditional Foods friendly! Click through for recipe!

Got any questions? Wanna tell us how your butter black cod & veggies turned out? Well we wanna here from you! Leave a comment or question below!

BFF diet free resource library

Revivalist Kitchen Salad Dressings . Traditional foods, BFF diet, Paleo, Ketogenic, AIP, Friendly salad dressings. Click through for five recipes!

Salad Dressings

Fermented Currant, Pear, & Horseradish Chutney! We love Fermentation! Traditional Foods, Paleo, GAPS, AIP, diet friendly! Save this pin for later!

Fermented Currant, Pear, & Horseradish Chutney

Birthday Cupcakes! Grain free, gluten free, refined sugar free, protein packed, made with whole food ingredients. Click through to read recipe.

Grain Free Cupcakes

Brussels Sprout Salad, Vegan, plant based, delicious salad. Paleo, Ketogenic, AIP, and GAPS diet Friendly. By Revivalist Kitchen!

Brussels Sprout Salad,

Lamb Meatball Zoodles

Lamb Meatball Zoodles 

Lamb Meatball Zoodles are a great low carb meal, full of healthy fats, and a probiotic kick! This meal is BFF diet, Traditional foods, & ketogenic friendly ! Click through to get recipe!

The first time I ever heard of a spiralizer, aka a “zoodler” (as Octavia calls it), I pretty much dropped everything I was doing and burned rubber to my nearest Sur La Table to get one for myself. While we are never gonna fool anyone into thinking they are eating pasta instead of zucchini ribbons, zoodles are as fun to eat as they are too say. Plus they are grain free and super low carb. This recipe for lamb meatballs with cucumber-yogurt sauce and zoodles was well loved by my clients who ate real pasta on the regular, as well as those who live a more BFF Diet friendly lifestyle. Lamb is a great meat option as it is often 100% grass-fed and it breaks up the beef-chicken rut that is so easy to fall into. In general, ground meat is an inexpensive source of protein plus with the fat ground in, it’s a great way to get it in for those of us who squirm at the idea of chewing up pieces of fatty meat.  With the fresh herbs and cool yogurt sauce, this dish is a wonderful introduction both to lamb and the joys of the “zoodler”. Enjoy this meal with a mug of bone broth and you’ve got yourself a complete BFF meal.

Lamb Meatball Zoodles are a great low carb meal, full of healthy fats, and a probiotic kick! This meal is BFF diet, Traditional foods, & ketogenic friendly ! Click through to get recipe!

Lamb Meatball Zoodles Recipe

1 bunch mint, chopped
1 bunch dill, chopped
1 large cucumber
4 zucchini
1.5lbs ground grass-fed lamb
1 lemon
1 T salt divided
1 cup plain yogurt (we like Strauss Greek yogurt)
3 cloves of garlic
Splash of olive oil, ghee or lard to cook meatballs
1/4C water

Lamb Meatball Zoodles are a great low carb meal, full of healthy fats, and a probiotic kick! This meal is BFF diet, Traditional foods, & ketogenic friendly ! Click through to get recipe!

Start by making the cucumber sauce first so the flavors can mix. A thick yogurt is great here as the cucumber releases water and thins it out. Peel the cucumber if it has been waxed and dice, discarding the seeds if they are large and woody. Add diced cucumber, 1 tsp. salt, 1T of the chopped mint and half of the chopped dill to the yogurt. Peel garlic cloves and using a microplane grate 2 cloves of the raw garlic into the yogurt. Zest the lemon and reserve for the meatballs and juice the rest. Strain the lemon juice and add to the yogurt mixture. Taste yogurt for salt and refrigerate until needed.

 

Next make your lamb mixture. In a large bowl combine the remaining chopped herbs, lemon zest, salt and lamb. Using the microplane again, grate the remaining garlic into the bowl with the lamb and mix with your very clean hands until well combined. (Or use a big spoon if you prefer). These meatballs are best made on the smallish side, as they fall apart when cooking if they are too big, about 1oz each is perfect. That said what is most important here is that whatever size you choose, try to make them all about the same so they cook evenly. Once you have your meatballs made you can pop them in the fridge to rest while you prep your zoodles.
To make zoodles use your spiralizer according to it’s directions. Or, if you don’t have a spiralizer, just thinly slice whole zucchini lengthwise to make more of a zucchini pappardelle. Prep all your zoodles, as the meatballs need a little attention while they cook and once you start it all moves kinda fast.

 

To finish up heat a large pan over medium-high heat, add in your meatballs and frying oil. Allow the meatballs to cook on each side until brown. Don’t rush moving them around too much, you want each side to get a nice brown crust. A really firm shake of the pan will get them moving around when they have begun to brown, carefully scraping up any that may choose to stick. Continue to cook the meatballs until they are brown and gorgeous on all sides, then remove from the pan and reserve.

 

Add a little fresh filtered water to the pan you cooked the meatballs in, just enough to coat the bottom and scrape up all the tasty browned meatball shrapnel left behind. Add in your zoodles and season with a sprinkle of salt. The zoodles will steam-saute in around 3 minutes and they need to be served right away. Cook your zoodles until they are just soft, as they very easily can turn to mush. The meatballs make great leftovers, but the zoodles not so much and they are best cooked to order. The yogurt sauce is good for a couple of days but it gets watery fast. To serve, pile up the meatballs on top of the zoodles alongside a healthy amount of the refreshing yogurt sauce for dipping.

 

Lamb Meatball Zoodles are a great low carb meal, full of healthy fats, and a probiotic kick! This meal is BFF diet, Traditional foods, & ketogenic friendly ! Click through to get recipe!

Lamb Meatball Zoodles are a great low carb meal, full of healthy fats, and a probiotic kick! This meal is BFF diet, Traditional foods, & ketogenic friendly ! Click through to get recipe!

©Revivalist Kitchen 2016. All rights reserved.

A Guide on Fats, the Good, the Bad, and the Super Ugly

A Guide on Fats, the Good, the Bad, and the Super Ugly

A Guide on Fats, the Good, the Bad, and the Super Ugly. Click here to read more on which fats are actually healthy and which fats are causing dies and obesity.

Here’s the skinny on fats, the good the bad and the super ugly. Adding traditional fats into our diet has been a big game changer for us Revivalist Girls: more energy, less hunger and better fitting clothes. It’s also the last “F” in our amazing BFF diet, read all about that here.

So often we begin to talk about fats and are met with a “oh, I know fat is good, but the good fats”. Sadly the fats that get labeled the “good” fats are often the big bads we call creepy oils: industrially produced polyunsaturated vegetable oils. These oils are creepy because they masquerade under the label of heart healthy, while being incredibly damaging to our body when consumed on a regular basis.

A big part of reducing the toxins in your diet is clearing out the fats that throw our bodies balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids out of whack, leading to increased inflammation in the body. Healthy fats nourish our body and are an essential part of our diet, but it is important to choose your fat wisely. Below is a breakdown of the fats and oils we allow in Revivalist Kitchen and which fats and oils we have kicked firmly to the curb.

Great for Cooking

These are the good guys that have been punished for crimes they did not commit. Health boosting saturated fats are great for cooking and add tons of flavor to our food. The quality here matters: lard from a bucket at the supermarket is often highly refined, while pasture raised rendered lard is minimally processed and comes from healthy animals. All animal fats are from animals fed their natural diets and raised in a humane environment. Coconut oils are organic and while safe for frying, coconut oil has a lower smoke point then animal fats such as tallow and lard, and should not be over heated.

Unrefined Coconut Oil

Lard from Pasture Raised Animals

Ghee from pasture raised animals

Duck fat, schmaltz/chicken fat, goose fat 

Great Healthy Fats that should not be heated to very high temperatures 

Butter made from pasture raised animals

Organic Olive Oil

Avocado Oil

Macadamia nut oil

Healthy Oils that should not be heated

Walnut, Pecan & Pistachio Oil

Flaxseed oil (very high in omega-3 but use sparingly, 1/2 tsp. daily, in salad dressings, shakes and spreads)

These Fats are Just Ok

These oils masquerade as healthy oils but without enough omega-3 these oils can cause inflammation in the body. Compared to genetically modified pesticide laden canola oil, these oils are really not great, but not horrible. However they are all very high in omega-6 fatty acids and should be avoided when possible, especially when an alternative is available. 

Palm (this is a healthy oil with some major problems with sustainable production. Buy this oil with caution to the source)

Safflower Oil

Sunflower Seed Oil 

Sesame Seed Oil

Grapeseed oil 

Organic Peanut Oil 

The Bad 

These oils are not good for human consumption in any amount. WARNING: these oils lurk in everything from commercial salad dressings, to the fryer at your favorite restaurant, to baked goods, snack foods, prepared foods and beyond. Practice reading your and avoid products that contain these environmentally damaging, heart hurting, inflammation inducing. creepy industrial oils. 

Soy

Corn

Canola

Vegetable Oil Blends

Olive/Vegetable Oil Blends

Really Bad & the Ugly

Imagine taking something already horrible and then going out of your way to make it way worse. Trans-fat is the jewel in heart disease’s crown. Trans-fats are not food, these are highly processed bad oils that were already unsafe for human consumption that have been converted from liquid oil to a solid fat (replicating a naturally saturated fat in consistency). This is a cheap, replacement fat used to boost profits for unscrupulous companies taking advantage of the misinformation regarding fat consumption that has been allowed to flourish by our government. Beware products claiming zero grams of trans fat per serving, as our blessed FDA has allowed that to be printed on products that contain up to one half gram of hydrogenated oil/trans-fat. Eat two servings and boom, you got a gram of poison straight to the ticker.

Hydrogenated Oil

Non-organic soy, corn, canola 

Crisco

Hydrogenated Vegetable Shortening

Spray oils like Pam that contain chemical propellants

Margarine 

We hope this guide will help you make better choices for you and your loved ones when it comes to choosing the right kind of fats for your plate. Have any questions for us? Leave a comment below! We love hearing from our readers!

 © Copyright 2016 Revivalist Kitchen. All rights reserved.

BFF diet free resource library

Keep on cooking!…Click through below for more real food recipes!

Pros & Cons of the best broth making gear. Paleo, GAPS, AIP, & Ketogenic diet friendly. Click through to read recipe & get your FREE bone broth tutorial video!

Broth Gear

Mmmm Chicken Soup made with Bone Broth! Paleo, GAPS, AIP, & Ketogenic diet friendly. Click through to read recipe & get your FREE bone broth tutorial video!

Mmmm Chicken Soup